Moving Target

faithcriticism

Today’s readings (click below to open in new tab/window):
Psalms 54; 146, Ecclesiastes 2:16-26, Galatians 1:18-2:10, Matthew 13:53-58


The church is an easy target. As a human institution claiming to represent Christ on earth, we paint that target on our own backs. Squabbling internally, failing to live up to our own standards, or engaging in outright corruption opens us to criticism from, well, everyone. Because we are human we are often hypocrites, and because we are Christian we are charged with combating religious hypocrisy. Unfortunately our historical response to criticism of that paradox has been to double down on our own righteousness, thereby making the target ever broader. Calls to return to vague “traditional values” may feel satisfying to internal hardliners, but for those who are outside the church looking in, it only reinforces their perception of hypocrisy.

If we are introspective, rather than defensive, about the health of the body of Christ, we just might conclude the honest and humble response to criticism is admitting we have always fallen short of our ideals. In his letter to the Galatians, Paul addresses a church that is only twenty years old. Already there is infighting between Paul and Peter over Gentile inclusion. Rival (he calls them false) interpreters of scripture and doctrine have infiltrated Galatia. He has to refute claims that he isn’t endorsed by Peter, James and other Apostles. A mere two decades in, the church was providing much of the same fodder for criticism it does today.

Maybe the church should be a target. Our promise is not that we are righteous, but that we are forgiven. Honest criticism can be the swift kick in the back door we need to remind ourselves. We need to own the infighting, particularly around matters of justice. A homogenized church at peace with itself is stagnant; a church in conversation with itself – even heated conversation – is making room for the Spirit to be heard. Intentionally or not, the message we send is: “We are better.” Nobody believes that, nor should they. The story we need to tell is: “We are no better, but God’s loving mercy redeems us.” When that is the story we also tell ourselves, it becomes true.

Comfort: Being honest about our failings is a testament to God’s love.

Challenge: When you hear criticism, of the church or otherwise, take time for introspection before defending yourself.

Prayer: God of forgiveness, teach me to tell the story of your love. Amen.

Discussion: What hypocrisies of the church bother you the most? Where do you find productive places to discuss your concerns?

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2 thoughts on “Moving Target

  1. I don’t have Facebook so I’ll comment here (if no response I’ll forgive you – I’m instructed to 😛 )

    I do believe we are privileged to be held at a higher standard than our society which at the end of the day brings glory to God. However when I know of fellow professed followers of Jesus act like unbelievers it irritates me. To me they disgrace God’s grace by using it as a license to sin rather than using His grace to overcome daily temptations, character flaws and sinful behaviors. I too fall and I disappoint myself daily but I thank God for His daily mercies.

    Liked by 1 person

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